Showing posts with label mardi gras krewe. Show all posts
Showing posts with label mardi gras krewe. Show all posts

Monday, February 1, 2021

Hire A Mardi Gras Artist

Since the pandemic has totally wrecked the Mardi Gras season for 2021 a lot of artists have had a difficult time with getting work. But New Orleans is the city that will hold it's own no matter what happens. So a project was created by the Krewe of Red Beans where anyone can arrange to hire an artist. 

Parades are on hold this year but houses are being decorated with all sorts of theme for Mardi Gras. The Hire A Mardi Gras Artist utilizes crowd funding where you can go to their site and make a purchase or donate. They then use the funds to hire local laid off Mardi Gras workers, musicians and artists. Instead of parade floats they are contracted to transform houses into works of Mardi Gras creativity and unique beauty for all to see.

Check out https://hireamardigrasartist.com/ and help support the artists!

Thanks for visiting, please feel to leave comments. 

Sondra Carpenter
The Mardi Gras Girl


Wednesday, February 8, 2017

The Mardi Gras Krewe Of Krewe Du Vieux

The Krewe du Vieux, one of New Orleans more controversial Mardi Gras krewes, will be parading Saturday, February 11, 2017. The name of their krewe is formally Krewe du Vieux CarrĂ©, and Vieux CarrĂ© is French for the French Quarter, a very popular neighborhood in New Orleans. 

They marched for the first time in 1987 and have been a local favorite with their satirical and amusing adult parade themes. "Where The Vile Things Are" and “Habitat for Insanity” are just a couple of examples. Also they continue to parade in the traditional fashion with mule drawn carriages in addition to other parade floats.

Krewe du Vieux was the first krewe to march during Mardi Gras after Hurricane Katrina in 2006. They gained national attention for facing adversity with humor. 


If you want to catch up with them visit this site which lays out their parade route:
http://www.mardigrasneworleans.com/schedule/parade-info/krewe-du-vieux.html

Feel free to post comments below. Thanks for visiting!

Photo credit: www.bestofneworleans.com / gambit


Sondra Carpenter
The Mardi Gras Girl
TheMardiGrasGirl.com

Monday, January 9, 2017

The Mardi Gras Walking Clubs

The walking clubs consist of people that gather together to enjoy the Mardi Gras experience. These Mardi Gras krewes may walk holding banners, some participants wearing costumes and others play music. 

They offer a personalized version of the celebration, each with their own traditions.

A few that parade during Mardi Gras are:


* The The North Side Skull and Bone Gang

This group starts out in the Treme, the oldest Black neighborhood in the country, in the wee hours of the morning. 
Click here to read my previous post about this krewe.

* The Society of Saint Anne or St. Anne Revelers
They are known for their beautiful colorful costumes and for their ritual of carrying the ashes through the parade of Society members that have passed away to the Mississippi River.

* KOE (formerly Krewe of Elvis)
This walking club is interesting in that it is made up of members from around the country as well as worldwide and anyone can join. Members dress in costume according to that year's theme. Usually Mardi Gras organizations consist of New Orleans area locals only. 

Pictured are revelers from Saint Anne. Photo credit: AP Photo/Gerald Herbert

For updated schedules on the walking clubs for 2017 you'll want to check out this page: http://www.mardigrasparadeschedule.com/Mardi-Gras-Marching-Clubs/

You can post comments below. Thanks for visiting!


Sondra Carpenter
The Mardi Gras Girl
TheMardiGrasGirl.com

Friday, January 6, 2017

Carnival Season And Mardi Gras Festivities Begin January 6

Mardi Gras Day is February 28 this year, but that's not when you want to start getting involved in the festivities. The actual Carnival Season begins each year on January 6, which is also Three King's Day or Feast of the Epiphany.

The Mardi Gras krewe of The Phunny Phorty Phellows will be riding the streetcar tonight to start off the season. 

They'll be in the Uptown section of the city and heading down St. Charles Avenue on a streetcar starting at 7PM. This krewe has a tradition of satire and fun as opposed to the regal presentation presented by the Krewe of RexCheck out their website for more details at: http://www.phunnyphortyphellows.com


Parades from several krewes and clubs will be running every day through to Mardi Gras.

Photo credit: Kathleen Flynn, NOLA.com / The Times-Picayune

You can post questions or comments below. Thank for visiting!


Sondra Carpenter
The Mardi Gras Girl
TheMardiGrasGirl.com

Thursday, December 22, 2016

2017 Theme Announced For Mardi Gras Krewe Of Zulu

Part of the fun for every Mardi Gras season is to hear the announcements and details of the new theme for the Mardi Gras krewes. Although Mardi Gras is an enjoyable celebration, one krewe has a more serious theme
that they'll be focused on this year.

The Krewe Of Zulu has declared their theme for 2017 to be "Stop The Violence". All of the krewe's throws and parade floats will reflect this theme. The president of the organization, Naaman Stewart, stated he wanted to take a stand and express concerns about violent crime. Although Mardi Gras is an entertaining event, we're all also hoping this new message is reaching its audience in a more profound way.

Click here for my previous post to read more about the African American Mardi Gras Krewe Of Zulu.

Photo credit: mardigrasneworleans.com


Feel free to post comments below. Thanks for visiting!


Sondra Carpenter
The Mardi Gras Girl
TheMardiGrasGirl.com

Monday, December 19, 2016

The Mardi Gras Krewe Of Rex

One of the biggest and oldest Mardi Gras krewes is Rex, which has also held the most parades.

The krewe began in 1872 in response to having a way of entertaining guests and getting support to get businesses and prominent individuals to invest in New Orleans after the Civil War. 
Also Grand Duke Alexis Romanoff from Russia was due to visit New Orleans for Mardi Gras that year, so everyone wanted to make a good impression.



Despite its prominence the Krewe Of Rex is not considered a Super Krewe since they still don't use a lot technological advances in their parades like fiber optic lights. Their  parades are run the way they originally have been for generations with colorfully costumed members and decorative floats. The Rex parade is managed by the organization The School Of Design.

The tradition continues on today to prepare for the arrival of Rex, The King Of Carnival to
arrive into the city by boat on the Monday before Mardi Gras Day, which is also called Lundi Gras.

Rex is Latin for "King" and Rex reigns during the Mardi Gras season as the King Of Carnival.

Photo Credit: Sabree Hill - UptownMessenger.com


Please feel to post questions or comments below. Thanks for stopping by!


Sondra Carpenter
The Mardi Gras Girl
TheMardiGrasGirl.com

Tuesday, February 9, 2016

Happy Mardi Gras Day 2016!

Hey, Happy Mardi Gras 2016! Check out the live stream for the Mardi Gras parades and floats for the big day. This is it, starting with the Krewe of Zulu, who's celebrating 100 years of incorporation with new floats,  through the Krewe of Crescent City in New Orleans. 

New Orleans Local News, Weather, Sports, Investigations

Check it out, have fun!

Sondra Carpenter
The Mardi Gras Girl

Friday, January 29, 2016

2016 Is The 20th Anniversary Of The Krewe Of Oshun


The Mardi Gras parades are rolling! Today, Friday, January 29 the Krewe Of Oshun will parade in the Uptown section of New Orleans starting at 6:00PM. This year also marks the krewe's 20th annivarsary!

This year's theme is called It's a Sea of Beauty. It's all about everything beneath the sea. Floats will reflect the ocean including sea horses, oysters and more. Throws will include peacock themed krewe bracelets and fans as well as beads. Also the New Orleans Marching Baby Dolls will be featured in the parade.

This krewe is run by African American women; it's named after the Yoruba goddess of beauty and love with their symbol being the peacock. Oshun also represents fountains and wealth to people throughout the African diaspora particularly Brazil, Cuba and Haiti.

The organization was founded in 1996, providing community service and entertainment throughout the year.

Click here to check out their schedule.
Photo credit: Sabree Hill - UptownMessenger.com

Thanks for reading, feel free to comment below.


Sondra Carpenter
The Mardi Gras Girl


Monday, January 25, 2016

Mardi Gras Parades For 2016


The party is ON folks! Just because Mardi Gras Day falls on February 9, 2016 this year doesn't mean you have to wait until next month to start enjoying the festivities.

Krewes have been rolling their colorful floats and throwing trinkets not only around the French Quarter, but they'll also be appearing Uptown, near the Garden District as well as Marigny and Mid City. Some will also parade outside of the city in areas like Metairie. 

For a full schedule of all of the parades including maps and krewes' estimated start time, click here.

Feel free to post comments below, thanks for stopping by!


Sondra Carpenter
The Mardi Gras Girl

Tuesday, October 6, 2015

5 Ways You Can Be A Mardi Gras Star And Ride A Parade Float

It's a lot of fun to yell "Throw me something mister!" in the streets of New Orleans during
Mardi Gras to get the krewe members to hurl some beads at you. But have you ever thought about actually being a part of the action and riding on a parade float while throwing trinkets to the adoring crowds in your costume? 

Well there's a few ways you can do just that. One easy way to participate is to go through New Orleans Craigslist postings and look for krewe members advertising space available on their float. 

I've seen an ad that says they provide a costume, food and drinks included in the fee. Did a search for Mardi Gras in Community to find listings. 

Click here to view this link that covers 4 more ways to be part of the Mardi Gras parade experience.
Photo credit: Carol M. Highsmith

Let me know what you think of this post. You can post comments below.


Sondra Carpenter
The Mardi Gras Girl

Monday, October 29, 2012

Join The Krewe Of Freret Now For Mardi Gras 2013

I was contacted through Twitter by a representative of the Krewe of Freret suggesting a post on how to join their krewe. Since my blog is about all things Mardi Gras, here it is!
The Krewe of Freret consists mainly, but not exclusively, of Tulane and Loyola graduates as well as business owners. It's a co-ed organization that welcomes those who are locals and non-locals interested in continuing the Mardi Gras tradition.
 
The original Krewe of Freret was actually disbanded in the 1990's. In 2011 seven Loyola graduates wanted to have their own krewe which included friends, associates and others who wanted to participate in a krewe where they would have input regarding the activities. They decided to resurrect this krewe that had been part of the community for many years in keeping with the neighborhood's commercial revitalization.
 
They will be riding down St. Charles Avenue, in the Uptown section of New Orleans. Membership includes riding in the parade on floats with brass bands and of course plenty of beads.
 
Click here to visit the Krewe of Freret website for more details. You'll also find the application for membership to join the krewe!
 
Thanks for visiting! Feel free to leave comments below.
 
 
Sondra Carpenter
The Mardi Gras Girl

Sunday, October 14, 2012

The Mardi Gras Indians, First African American Mardi Gras Krewe

You won't see them with the rest of the krewes and walking clubs during the Mardi Gras celebrations.That's because they don't hang out around Canal Street near the French Quarter or Uptown near St. Charles Avenue where all the other krewes parade. I admit, because I didn't know the schedule until late last year, I still haven't seen them perform myself. You may be able to see them at the Jazz and Heritage Festivals if you don't catch them on Mardi Gras Day, St. Joseph's Day or a Super Sunday. I'm referring to the Mardi Gras Indians, the oldest African American Mardi Gras Krewe.

The Mardi Gras Indians mask in the historically African American neighborhood of Treme in New Orleans and make stops at different local restaurants and taverns in the community. Since African Americans were not included in the earlier Mardi Gras parades, they created their own celebrations within their neighborhoods.

You can contact the Backstreet Cultural Museum in Treme for information on the schedule, which is where I found out a lot about the history. This amazing African American cultural tradition goes back to the early 1800's with the Creole Wild West shows. Native Americans were credited with assisting African Americans during slavery and this was a way to pay homage.

The costumes, called suits, are made of not only feathers but also intricate bead work. They take about a year to make and weigh at least 100 pounds. They also don't wear the same one twice. The downtown suits are made more of feathers indicative of Native American tribes and the uptown costumes are more reminiscent of West African beading traditions.

The amazing picture displayed on this post is of the Cheyenne Gang. Photo credit goes to Perry Braniff, Sr.


*** Click here also for more information on the Mardi Gras Indians.

Thanks for visiting. There is so much more to the Mardi Gras Indian culture than what's covered on this post. If you'd like me to add more about information about this topic on the blog please let me know by posting your comments below.


Sondra Carpenter
The Mardi Gras Girl

Saturday, October 13, 2012

The Mardi Gras Krewe Of Orpheus

The Krewe of Orpheus is one of the newer additions to the Mardi Gras Carnival Parade. It was founded in 1993 by musician and native of New Orleans, Harry Connick, Jr. His father, Harry Connick, Sr. is also a member and is currently president. Orpheus takes it's name from the mythological Greek god of music. Traditionally their parade route goes through the Uptown section of New Orleans.
They start loading the floats on Lundi Gras Day (the day before Fat Tuesday) with tons of beads and other throws and start parading that evening.

One of the differences between Orpheus and many other krewes is their open membership. Most krewes are closed social groups, but Orpheus has stated that they accept members regardless of race or gender. 

The krewe also has Celebrity Monarchs every year that participate in the parade and ride on their floats. Entertainers including Forest Whitaker, Stevie Wonder, Whoopi Goldberg, Cyndi Lauper, Bret Michaels and Sandra Bullock are just a few that have rode with the krewe during Mardi Gras celebrations.

Click here to find out more about the Krewe of Orpheus.

Feel free to leave comments below!


Sondra Carpenter
The Mardi Gras Girl


Saturday, September 22, 2012

History Of The Zulu Social Aid And Pleasure Club

In the early 1900's a group of African American laborers created a Social or Benevolent Aid Society which eventually came to be called the Zulus. These organizations were set up for African American residents of New Orleans where they could pay dues in order to be able to arrange for funeral costs. These societies were known to offer them the earliest forms of insurance.
The Krewe of Zulu was originally created as a mockery of Rex, the King of Carnival, since African Americans were not included in these parades. The Zulu's first King, William Story, wore ragged clothes and a crown made out of a lard can while carrying a banana stalk scepter. He was accompanied by a quartet, and in 1915 they created their first parade floats.

The most famous King of the Krewe of Zulu was Louis Armstong in 1949, who participated in their first celebrity march.

Still the most popular of all the throws given out during Mardi Gras is the Zulu Coconut, also called the "Golden Nugget". The krewe started handing them out to the crowds around 1910, then in their natural furry state. Some years later they were scraped off and painted.

During the 1960's the krewe lost popularity since during the Civil Rights era the act of the Zulus parading in blackface and grass skirts was seen as demeaning to the African American community.  Many organizations protested against the krewe and their members began to dwindle.

The loyalty of the Zulu members has kept the organization alive. They have grown back in large numbers and are heavily involved in donating their time as well as funds to local schools and charities.

The Zulu Social Aid & Pleasure Club is the second oldest African American krewe and the oldest in the main Carnival Parade. The Krewe of Zulu consists of African American men from all walks of life and professions, from laborers to politicians and is known for it's many community contributions.


Click here to visit this site for more on the history of the Krewe of Zulu.


You can post any questions or comments below. Thanks for visiting!


Sondra Carpenter
The Mardi Gras Girl


Sunday, September 16, 2012

The Mardi Gras Krewes

A krewe is a group of individuals that participates in Mardi Gras parades, balls and other related activities. This tradition in New Orleans goes back to the 1800's. Krewes that were formed during that time include Rex, Comus and Proteus. These organizations offered businessmen of those times good connections and credentials.
 
There are currently dozens of krewes and more are created each year. Some krewes are more exclusive, the members mostly include family members and friends. Others are more open to anyone who can pay the fees and agree to participate. Fees for annual krewe membership can run from less than 100 dollars to thousands depending on the how elaborate floats and costumes are. The more expensive fees can also cover outsourcing of the krewe's costume design as well as Mardi Gras parade float construction.


The krewe of the Phunny Phorty Phellows starts off the Carnival Season each year on January 6, the Twelth Night. Although krewes all have different rules, their main purpose is to celebrate Mardi Gras through sponsoring parades and balls. Although it's great to be part of a Mardi Gras parade, it's more to it than just fun and partying.

Click here to read the article Confessions Of A Mardi Gras Krewe Captain

It's amazing to me how the krewes put together all the festive arrangements for Mardi Gras year after year. The work including the planning gets started for the next year soon after the current year's celebrations have ended.

Click here for more information on the history and themes of some of the Mardi Gras Krewes.

Stay tuned for more posts on some of the krewes.
 


Feel free to leave comments or questions. Thanks for reading!


Sondra Carpenter
The Mardi Gras Girl